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U.S. Government Accountability Office Examines Sustainable Chemistry - Mar 14, 2018

Can the chemistry behind medicines, personal care products, and other everyday items be improved? This was the question at hand when U.S. GAO examined “sustainable chemistry.”

They found that stakeholders generally didn't agree on how to define or assess sustainable chemistry. However, they cited several common themes, such as using fewer non-renewable resources and considering all stages of a product's life cycle when evaluating environmental impact.

U.S GAO looked at more... Read more

NPR's Howard Berkes reports today on the largest cluster of severe black lung disease ever reported in the U.S. - Feb 07, 2018

NPR's Howard Berkes reports today on the largest cluster of severe black lung disease ever reported in the U.S. The story is part of his 14 month investigation that broadcast on February 6, 2018 on All Things Considered.

Berkes reports: During the period 2013 to 2017, and from just three clinics in southwestern Virginia, more than 400 cases of Progressive Massive Fibrosis were diagnosed and now confirmed by NIOSH.

The findings are published today in the Journal of the American... Read more

Seattle contractor charged with felony for employee's death in 2016 trench collapse - Jan 11, 2018

January 9, 2018 via The Seattle Times

Harold Felton was working to re-connect a new sewer line to a West Seattle house when the trench where he was working caved in, burying him in wet soil. His boss is accused of criminal negligence in his January 2016 death.

By Sara Jean Green, Seattle Times staff reporter

A Seattle contractor accused of criminal negligence is believed to be the first employer in state history to face felony charges... Read more

Researchers tout safer alternative to potentially deadly paint stripper chemical - Jan 02, 2018

January 2, 2018 via CBS News

An alternative to a potentially deadly chemical found in common paint strippers is facing hurdles to reach consumers. CBS News' Anna Werner reported last month on the deaths of dozens of people who used methylene chloride. The EPA indefinitely postponed a ban on that chemical last month, proposed by the Obama administration.

Now, researchers say if the industry won't come up with a safer product, they will. Activists like Mike Schade, who runs the... Read more

U.S. Department of Labor’s OSHA Extends Compliance Date for Electronically Submitting Injury, Illness Reports to December 15, 2017 - Nov 22, 2017

WASHINGTON, DC – To allow affected employers additional time to become familiar with a new electronic reporting system launched on August 1, 2017, the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has extended the date by which employers must electronically report injury and illness data through the Injury Tracking Application (ITA) to December 15, 2017.

OSHA’s final rule to Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses sets December 15, 2017,... Read more

AIHA 2017 State of the Environmental Health and Safety Survey Results Released - Oct 10, 2017

The American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA) recently published their annual state of the industry survey. The survey, which polled 744 EH&S professionals, discoverd that, "Chemical exposure and chemical management combined to be the single largest concern (33.49%) amongst EHS professionals."

Respondents also indicated that stronger support from leadership and executive teams for EH&S... Read more

Regularly using bleach linked to higher risk of fatal lung disease - Sep 18, 2017

Use of disinfectants once a week could increase risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by as much as 32%, study finds.

The Guardian | Nicola Swanson | September 10, 2017

Regular use of bleach and other common disinfectants has been linked to a higher risk of developing fatal lung disease, researchers have found.

The use of disinfectants is linked to a higher risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), according to research looking... Read more

OSHA Reduces Reports of Workplace Fatalities: Move comes as agency cuts back on the amount of information on accidents made available to the public - Aug 28, 2017

By Alexandra Berzon Aug. 27, 2017 12:41 p.m. ET

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is reducing its reporting of fatalities in the U.S., part of a series of moves by the agency that are cutting back the amount of information about workplace accidents made available to the public.

The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, which had long complained about the practice, asked OSHA to roll back some of the information in the fatality reporting and other initiatives when the Trump... Read more

Workplace accident death rate higher for older workers - Aug 03, 2017

In 2015, about 35 percent of the fatal workplace accidents involved a worker 55 and older — or 1,681 of the 4,836 fatalities reported nationally.

Older people are dying on the job at a higher rate than workers overall, even as the rate of workplace fatalities decreases, according to an Associated Press analysis of federal statistics.

It’s a trend that’s particularly alarming as baby boomers reject the traditional retirement age of 65 and keep working. The U.S. government... Read more

Pediatrician who exposed dangers of lead poisoning, dies at 89 - Jul 24, 2017

Herbert L. Needleman, a pediatrician and psychiatrist who demonstrated in the late 1970s that children exposed to even small amounts of lead could suffer intellectual and behavioral deficits, a finding that spurred and emboldened wide-ranging safety regulations, died July 18 at an assisted living center in Pittsburgh. He was 89.

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