Pediatrician who exposed dangers of lead poisoning, dies at 89 - Jul 24, 2017

Herbert L. Needleman, a pediatrician and psychiatrist who demonstrated in the late 1970s that children exposed to even small amounts of lead could suffer intellectual and behavioral deficits, a finding that spurred and emboldened wide-ranging safety regulations, died July 18 at an assisted living center in Pittsburgh. He was 89.

Social and Environmental Justice in the Chemistry Classroom - Jul 20, 2017

A new paper has been published by Dr. Grace Lasker, and fellow MoDRN researchers. MoDRN (Molecular Design Research Network) is a Green Chemistry and Green Engineering initiative, which focuses on the rational design of chemicals and materials to reduce toxicity. This multidisciplinary effort is led by four universities who are addressing one of the key questions in environmental science: How can we reduce the toxicity of new chemical substances? This new paper, published in the Journal of... Read more

Washington State Receives an "A" in Workplace Safety! - Jul 07, 2017

A new report from the National Safety Council gave "A"s in workplace safety to only two states, Washington and Illinois. States were graded on three categories for workplace safety: Prevention, Preparedness and Enforcement (50%), Workers Compensation (25%), and Worker Health and Wellbeing (25%). The DEOHS Continuing Education Programs are honored to be part of the outstanding community working to continuously improve health and safety for workers accross the Pacific Northwest.... Read more

NIEHS Worker Training Program Making an Impact in Alaska - Jun 22, 2017

The NIEHS Worker Training Program (WTP) is a significant and integral national training element of the NIEHS “Hazardous Substance Basic Research and Training Program” authorized by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (42 USC 9660).

These Hazardous Waste program awardees provide health and safety training for workers who are, or can be, exposed to hazardous materials and waste as part of their jobs or during emergency response.

... Read more

FALL PREVENTION NATIONAL SAFETY STAND DOWN: LET’S CUT FALL FATALITIES IN CONSTRUCTION TO ZERO - May 19, 2017

May 17, 2017 | Jeffrey Dalto | convergencetraining.com

Fall Prevention and Protection has been in news a lot lately. The safety news, at least.

Fall prevention always generates a lot of discussions because falls are the leading cause of deaths in construction. In 2015, for example, there were 350 fatal falls to a lower level out of 937 construction fatalities. And fatalities are actually increasing in the last few years, not decreasing.

In addition, OSHA just held (May 8... Read more

Report: 27 Workers a Day Suffer Amputation or Hospitalization, According to OSHA Severe Injury Data from 29 States - Apr 27, 2017

Washington, D.C.—A new report issued today by the National Employment Law Project, analyzing severe injury data compiled by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) from employers in a little over half the states, finds an average of 27 workers a day suffer work-related amputations or hospitalizations.

Two poultry and meat processing companies, despite their relatively small size, reported among the largest numbers of severe injuries, according to the report,... Read more

Washington State Work-Related Fatalities Report 2016 - Apr 19, 2017

66 workers died in Washington State of work-related injuries, an increase of 3 fatalities from 2015. Falls and workplace violence remain the leading causes of fatalities. Falls in all industries (not just construction) are rising, as well as homicide in the workplace. The Work-Related Fatalities Report is put together by the FACE Program at the Washington State Department of Labor and Industries.

Current Status and Future Challenges in Molecular Design for Reduced Hazard - Jan 20, 2017

Several DEOHS Faculty, as well as Faculty involved in the MoDRN grant have published a new paper titled Current Status and Future Challenges in Molecular Design for Reduced Hazard. This work is featured in the ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering Journal.

ABSTRACT: Synthetic chemicals and materials are the basis of our society and our economy. Yet, in spite of all the advances in toxicology that have helped us understand and even predict toxicity associated with industrial... Read more

One by one, 3 utility workers descended into a manhole. One by one, they died. - Jan 19, 2017

When a utility worker in Key Largo, Fla., noticed that a section of a paved street was not settling properly, he decided to remove a manhole cover and descend into the earth.

Moments later on Monday morning, the 15-foot-deep hole went silent. Sensing the man was trapped, a fellow utility worker climbed into the drainage hole to rescue him. When he, too, stopped responding, a third worker entered the same hole.

All three men died, overcome by poisonous fumes underground, the... Read more

How does workplace safety and health align with sustainability? - Jan 04, 2017

John Davies, GreenBiz.com

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

In May, we were contacted by representatives from the U.S. government’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to discuss how they might engage in efforts that bring the agency’s work into broader sustainability discussions and initiatives. We had a good discussion, connected them with corporate representatives we thought they should talk with, and asked... Read more

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