Chemotherapy isn’t just in hospitals. Nursing homes, pharmacists, and vets are also exposed. The Washington State Department of Labor & Industries adopted the first hazardous drugs rule in the nation on January 3, 2012. This new law is designed to protect healthcare workers, veterinarians, and pharmacists who are exposed to hundreds of hazardous drugs used for cancer chemotherapy, antiviral treatments, and other drug therapies that may cause serious health and safety harm. These drugs are well known for their acute and chronic toxicity in treated patients, but they may also impose risks to workers. This course is designed to discuss practical strategies to prevent occupational exposures to hazardous drugs and to share control strategies among participants. Workshops will give practitioners an opportunity to learn more about the best practices that have been effective in reducing exposures and to interact with other professionals who have successfully implemented controls in their workplaces. View pdf

Intended Audience
Healthcare workers, nurses, pharmacists, pharmacy technicians, physicians, physician assistants, veterinarians, veterinarian assistants/technicians, industrial hygienists, EH&S directors, risk managers, compounding pharmacists, state compliance officers, nursing home home health care staff, housekeeping and environmental services staff, and shipping and receiving personnel.

Course Objectives
At the completion of this course, participants should be able to:

  • Describe the evidence of the genotoxicity and reproductive effects of anti-cancer chemotherapy
  • Review medical surveillance protocols for workers dispensing hazardous drugs
  • Discuss the rationale and process for defining a hazardous drug
  • Identify environmental and ventilation controls used to reduce exposure to hazardous drugs
  • Summarize control strategies to reduce or prevent occupational exposures
  • List best practices across healthcare, pharmacy, and veterinarian sectors

Featured Speaker
Melissa A. McDiarmid, MD, MPH, DABT is Professor of Medicine and Director of the University of Maryland School of Medicine’s Occupational Health Program. She received her undergraduate and medical degrees from the University of Maryland at Baltimore and her MPH from the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health where she also completed fellowship training in Occupational Medicine. She is board certified in Internal Medicine, Occupational Medicine, and Toxicology.

Planning Committee
Rachael Crickman, Virginia Mason Medical Center
Pamela Cant, Washington State Labor &Industries
Larry Lee, Pacific Industrial Hygiene
Lisa Parshley, Olympia Veterinary Cancer Center
Jeff Rochon, Washington State Pharmacy Association
Alex Truchot, Group Health/CBRE
Lisa Van Loo, Washington State Labor &Industries
Nancy Simcox, UW DEOHS CE

Agenda
Click here to download a detailed agenda